1

My Social Media Playground

I’ve just signed up for a 30-day social media challenge for authors. And through the initial discussions it has occurred to me that social media can be very much likened to a playground (particularly by me – as I write children’s books, it’s a totally fitting analogy!)

So there’s:

 

The slide– You climb to the top, only to slide back down to the bottom, before starting your climb again. If you are not making a constant effort you get no-where, and even when you give it a huge push, you always end up right back at the beginning. For me, this is Instagram.

 

 

The Roundabout – Need I explain? You’re going round in circles. You’re not sure what you’re doing. You have momentum, but you’re not really sure you’re achieving anything at all. This is most likely linkedin in my world.

 

The Swings – Look at me! Look at me! Look how high I am. You can build momentum and keep it there, so long as you keep on swinging those little legs. Facebook!

The Fying Fox – We all love the flying fox right? Well the bit as we’re zipping along at breakneck speed, wind through our hair, huge cheesy grin on our faces. But then we hit the end, DOINK! And we have to get off, and run the thing all the way up the hill back to the beginning. This is Twitter, you have moments of fabulous engagement, you’re flying. Then DOINK! You run out of momentum and have to work you’re ass off to build it up again. But how much fun is the ride?!

The Phones – You know, the talky funnels. You think of something important to say and then in your biggest boldest voice you announce it into the funnel. Only to be heard, or miss-heard by the one person at the other end, who just happens to have their ear to the other funnel (your mum?). The Blog!

 

 

The Spinny Things– These I fear! I have been green in the past – I’m not being green again. They’re my no go zone. In social media, this is snap chat and pinterest. I’m not saying they’re not awesome for some people. It’s just I don’t have the stomach, especially not when I’ve already exhausted myself on all the other equipment.

 

But it’s all good fun. It’s all playing, right? Important not to take it too seriously, but maybe there are techniques to making each ride easier and more fun. And at the end of the day we all need friends at the park, if we don’t take them with us, we can make them there, and there’s lots of fun in that!!

For those interested the challenge is being run by Michelle Worthington, you can find it on facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/socialmediaforcreativebusinesses/?multi_permalinks=297067150819636%2C294818521044499&notif_id=1517826002446951&notif_t=group_activity&ref=notif

If you’d like to come play with me in the playground, you can find me here:

Blog: https://shellyunwin.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=shelly%20unwin%20author%20page

Insta: https://www.instagram.com/shellyunwin/

Twitter @unwin_shelly

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shellyunwin/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

Lothian looking for Junior Fiction

It is always good to get an insiders view on the publishing industry and this morning was no exception, with the delightful Suzanne O’Sullivan from Lothian sharing her thoughts at the NSW Writers’ Centre, First Friday Club.

Suzanne confirmed that with blockbuster titles from the likes of John Green helping the market along, children’s book sales continue to be very healthy. And the area of the children’s publishing market that Lothian are keen to see more strong submissions in, is Junior Fiction. Series books for 6-9 year olds, with an approximate word count of 15,000-20,00 words. Suzanne is also always on the look out for great picture books.

However getting your work in front of Suzanne is no mean feat, as she only accepts agented submissions, or submissions following on from consultations at conferences or literary speed dating.

But if you are lucky enough to make it into her pile of submitted manuscripts, these are her tips for how to stand out:

  • Have a really clear sense of the market, “this book fits into this trend,” or “this book fills this gap,” (but be careful that the gap really is a gap in the market and not a gap in your knowledge of the market!)
  • Really hone your writing. Make sure it is fully workshopped and edited before you send it.
  • Let your writing be the star, regardless of your other successes the writing needs to speak for itself.

And what themes is she looking for?

  • Humour, she loves a story that makes her laugh, but the humour must be supported by a good story with heart.
  • Friendship, friendship themes are always very popular in junior fiction.
  • Adventure based stories.

So according to Suzanne, what can writers be doing to help them achieve publication?

  • Be active on social media.
  • Be active in writers groups and attending conferences etc
  • Show a willingness to get out there and promote yourself.

Suzanne also mentioned a preference for authors who have a body of work targeting one area of the children’s market, so that they can build a strong readership and utilise this readership for the authors other books.

And there is a small glimmer of hope if you are not lined up to attend a conference or event where Suzanne is meeting writers- Lothian are currently thinking about opening up submissions for one genre at a time, probably early next year, so make sure you follow Suzanne on Twitter @Suzanne_OS and keep your eye on the Hachette website http://www.hachettechildrens.com.au

Happy writing everyone!